Prusa i3 3D printerPrusa i3 (i3 stands for third iteration of the design) is the latest design by me. There are countless variations of the design and it became a staple of 3D printing with tens, if not hundreds, of thousands units world wide. You can build simple one for couple hundred dollars or you can chip in more and get the state of the art 3D printer, it’s all up to you.

It’s open functional design allows for quick maintenance. For example if our DumbExtruder™ (LOL) breaks you can clean it in couple seconds! This makes i3 great workhorse 3D printer for your business. Not to mention the ability to upgrade the printer as you wish without manufacturer forcing you to buy a new model! Future-proof FTW!

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The printer is constantly under development. In the latest revision of the original version I switched the default extruder to E3D hotend. Read more about this latest update here. I also made it super easy to do color 3D prints based on the layer height. You can check out color 3D printing here or watch the video below!

P3D_Printing_Trends_May_2015___3D_Hubsrusa i3 became more popular than was ever anticipated. According to 3DHubs i3 is the #1 3D printer on the planet. The popularity led to hundreds of forks and the numbers are still growing 🙂

The best part is, as the community grows more people can share their tips and tricks. Also finding help is always easy online 🙂

3D printing with Prusa i3

Diablo from Ola Sundberg

© Ola Sundberg

19 thoughts on “Prusa i3 3D printer

  1. Quisiera saber donde puedo conseguir los planos del marco para construirme una Prusa 3 i
    en acrilico o en acero soy de Montevideo – Uruguay, aqui no he conseguido marcos hechos y traerlos del exterior se me encarecen mucho si consigo el croquis en archivo STL, lo puedo mandar a plotear en acrilico o a cortar en acero por laser.

    Espero respuesta gracias.

    Saludos.

    Heber Lago

  2. Does it need to be used with a 3mm filament? In my country (Chile) its hard to get, and it’ll be a lot easier if i can install the regular 1.75mm filament.

  3. where are the stl files located for Prusa I3 1.75mm high quality printer?
    love this machine but I have to print parts to fix it

  4. 2 thngs: Would it be possible to swap out the extruder nozzle with a custom made blu ray for laser cutting etc? And, please make said item and take my money.

  5. Received my i3 kit Thursday. Very nice quality, impressive build manual, though I preferred the on line version with bigger writing! Y belt was a bit too short but everything else excellent. Got a new belt locally so it was printing straight away. The settings for Slic3r are spot on, great prints! The kids love it too, queuing up with things to print! Thank you for sparing me the frustration usually associated with setting up a 3D printer.
    Andrew Young

  6. So, I’m 90% sold on the Prusa i3 as my first 3d printer. I am curious about how the quality of the individual parts effects the price. There are other “Prusa” model printers out there for half the price. What makes this a better printer than other Prusa based repraps? Is there a noticeable difference in the print quality of a cheaper reprap vs the Prusa i3?

    • It is easy, the others don’t have knock off electronics (often removing safety/over temp/ high current parts replacing them with nothing or lower rated parts), they don’t actually Innovate, they just copy (this is the company that started the i3 design), a genuine e3d (E3d knows more about melting plastics than any hot end maker, every machining step has a purpose, the knock offs skip steps), the mechanical parts are made with care ( you can buy cheap kits that fall apart), and automatic bed leveling (a god send)

  7. Where can I get the firmware to change hot end max temperature to at list 275C?
    I can’t get satisfying quality with printing ABS at 255C and on 260C I get an error.
    What is the allowed max temperature for hot end (I’ve got an official prusa i3 kit 2 month ago)
    Best regards

  8. Mr Prusa:

    I would like to suggest some possibly too expensive, but possibly VERY valuable additions to your machine:

    1)FRAME: use structural aluminum tube – This will provide greater stability AND the depth (vs current “flat” profile to add a SECOND system and print head.

    2)ELIMINATE the belt system! Instead use a stepper to turn a precision screw rod, possibly ball-race rod on x&y. Belts stretch and limit accuracy -even the best 2-D printers cannot match the quality offered by even the higher amateur digital cameras! It’s obsolete technology – worked for dot-matrix Epson RX-80s of the 1980s. It does NOT work on the company’s best artists’ printers. And the change is so simple!

    Put a hole mounted with the best bearing that makes sense from a cost/quality standpoint in the point carrier. directly couple 1 end to stepper motor, the other end to a bearing support end. It’s an even easier conversion for the y platform. Nothing that WILL eventually stretch. Nothing that limits accuracy by the number of teeth in gear/belt system.
    I suggest supporting Y mover system on a pair of parallel rod-on-U-shaped channel on either side of the precision screw rod.

    While changes are underway, improve the screws moving the platform on the Z-axis. Dump plastic for metal, allowing higher heat materials – better excess heat removal AND overall greater accuracy and stability.

    Offer the unit in various sizes, with a build volume of up to 1/2 cubic meter.

    Don’t discontinue the current system (aside from better X-transport. A beefed up system will at the least double the price of the current best-bang-for-buck machine on the market.

    The end of the hot point, as I said before, also is a place for adding an inexpensive improvement that will slow printing while improving accuracy – cut the minimum nozzle diameter by at least 50% – While less plastic can be deposited per pass, the accuracy should be radically improved.

    Lastly, a rather radical idea for the entire system: WHY do all plastic extruders lay down material via vector drawing? Just because the Makerbot Cupcake did? WHY NOT use the system used in almost every 2D printer today – give up the old plotter philosophy and lay each layer down as pattern of dots! For strength it may be a good idea to lay down the first layer with the X drive making the constant back and forth sweep while the Y platform moves only when a line is completed. The second pass would reverse the prder with the Y platform moving front to back, and the x platform moving a single line when the work is done. hyper-advanced models might even replace te square platform with a disk, allowing any degree of rotation between layers.

    Last idea – constant complaints about cost of material. Shredded soda bottles (after a thorough washing) dropped through a simplified hot point with the diameter of desired input could supply an inexpensive supply of PET filament – it might require careful cooling fans on the way down and manual attachment to an empty spool, but the material is free aside from the labor of cleaning and removing the hot-glue label attachment used on most 2-liter bottles. cheap, ugly, imperfect except for prototyping – and failures are quickly turned into fresh prototype material.

    My experience with 3D printing is VERY limited, and I only hope I have not simply wasted your time.

    However, if any of these systems prove useful, I, running on a very small salary, would appreciate being handed a unit integrating my obviosly open-source ideas for prototype testing.

    meanwhile, once I pay off my new-build last-10-years computer system (spend up front, avoid replacing every year or 2) my next purchase will be a current-model PRUSA printer, while I play around with some ideas for the Next Project – a camera/rotating platform/raise/lower mechanism, with luck and some friends to help, a device for duplicating complex-shaped items we can hold in our hands, but cannot describe in terms of complex shape.

    Now if I could only convince Epson to dump the toothed belts that limit its printers and become one of their testers too …(dream on, something might even work out)

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